Grain By-Products/
DDGS

Various grain types such as wheat, rye and spelt are processed into flour in flour mills in preparation for human consumption. This process results in grain by-products, which can be used in livestock feeds.

Wheat bran Wheat middlings DDGS (Distiller's Dried Grains with Solubles)

Wheat Bran

Wheat bran is a by-product of the production of flour from sieved wheat and consists predominantly of fragments of the outer husk; only a small proportion of it is grain.

Wheat bran is a popular straight feeding stuff. The crude fibre and starch content as well as crude protein content (approx. 13–15 %) in bran are of special importance in animal feed. Wheat bran is primarily used in special mixtures (e.g. in feeds for gestating and lactating breeding sows) on account of its dietary properties.

Wheat Bran Quality Parameters

Dry matter (DM) approx. 87 %
Crude protein approx. 13–15 %
Crude fat (XL)approx. 0.3 %
Crude fibre (XF)approx. 9 %
Crude ash (XA) approx. 6 %

We recommend using a feed rich in wheat bran for breeding sows around gestation, farrowing and lactation, since it has a preventative effect against constipation and against mastitis-metritis-agalactia syndrome (Etienne, 1987).

* As a natural product, wheat is subject to various factors that determine its quality, such as climatic conditions during the growing season; the soil condition of the cultivation area; the deployment of fertilisers or pesticides as well as production circumstances and the use of processing aids. The product quality may therefore vary from year to year. 

Wheat Middlings

Wheat middlings are the by-product of the flour manufacturing process using either wheat or wheat flakes made from purified wheat. It consists predominantly of fragments of the outer husk as well as particles of grain from which less of the endosperm has been removed than in wheat bran. The crude fibre and starch content as well as crude protein content (approx. 15–17 %) are of importance in animal feed. Wheat middlings are primarily added to feed as an effective dietary component.

Data

Dry matter:approx. 88%
Crude ash:approx. 49%
Crude fibre:approx. 8.2–8.5%
Crude fat:approx. 4.3 %
Crude protein: approx. 15–17%

* As a natural product, wheat is subject to various factors that determine its quality, such as climatic conditions during the growing season; the soil condition of the cultivation area; the deployment of fertilisers or pesticides as well as production circumstances and the use of processing aids. The product quality may therefore vary from year to year.

ProtiGrain®

CropEnergies produces the nutritionally valuable ProtiGrain® animal feed made from distiller dried grains – the main by-product of bioethanol produced from starch-rich materials. Distillers’ grains have been fed to livestock for hundreds of years in liquid form, though usage is correspondingly restricted to specific regions. The process of drying and pelleting distillers’ grains results in DDGS (Distillers' Dried Grains with Solubles). In Europe, it is a relatively new product that is marketable and stockable, and capable of being transported easily. DDGS is a high-quality feed for all livestock species on account of its high protein and fat content, as well as its favourable energy values.

Raw Material:Wheat, barley, corn, sugar syrups, triticale (where applicable), rye

Product Details

Dry matter (DM)92.3 %
Ingredients per kg of dry matter
Crude ash59 g
Crude protein315 g
Crude fibre88 g
Crude fat83 g 
Starch29 g
Sugar47 g
Nitrogen-free extract (NFE)455 g
Average composition:
Dry matterapprox. 90 %
Crude protein:approx. 29 %

Source: http://www.cropenergies.com/de/Lebens-Futtermittel/ProtiGrain/

* As a natural product, all raw material used in DDGS is subject to various factors that determine its quality, such as climatic conditions during the growing season; the soil condition of the cultivation area; the deployment of fertilisers or pesticides as well as production circumstances and the use of processing aids. The product quality may therefore vary from year to year. 

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